Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Euro-Global Summit and Expo on Biomass Birmingham, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Han-Sup Han

Humboldt State University, USA

Keynote: Biomass Energy: A Forest Management Perspective

Time : 10:00-10:35

OMICS International Euro Biomass 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Han-Sup Han photo
Biography:

Dr. Han-Sup Han’s current research efforts focus on the production of quality feedstocks and development of innovative biomass feedstock logistics systems. Recently, Dr. Han, along with 13 Co-PIs (Principal Investigators) and research partners, has received a $5.88 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct biomass research on the utilization of forest residues for production of bioenergy and biobased products. The research collaboration effort integrates three major tasks of 1) production of quality feedstock, 2) development of mobile biomass conversion technologies, and 3) economic/environmental analysis, as explained in the research project web site at www.wastetowisdom.com.

Abstract:

Forest residues increases forest fire hazards and impede the forest management activities such as tree planting and thinning operations. Logging residues are commonly burned on site however; open burning is not only costly and risky, but also causes problems including air emissions and damage to the soil due to the hot fires. In addition to logging residues, many small-diameter trees that are generated from fuel-reduction thinning activities, dead/dying trees due to insects/diseases and due to droughts need to be disposed. Biomass energy has been well served as a way of disposing forest residues. The production of energy by utilizing these forest residues create many other benefits which includes enhancing environmental protection, reducing fire hazards, creating local jobs with business opportunities, and facilitating forest management activities. In the US, there were an estimated 97 million dry tons of woody biomass for energy that could be sustainably available at a price of 60$ per dry ton. Low market values (<50 $/bone dry ton) for the woody biomass prevents the activity of forest management for the energy production in the western US. More recently there have been many federal- and state-level policies and regulations enacted to encourage the use of renewable energy including biomass, and with these changed market conditions and favorable policy support, biomass energy may be a desirable solution to help manage the forest residue disposal issues. This presentation illustrates the issues that forest residues create in the Western US and explains the new efforts that have been made to cost-effectively utilize (i.e. dispose of) these residues for energy production.

Keynote Forum

Bo G Eriksson

Swedish center for applied sociology AB, Sweden

Keynote: Desertcultivation and its contribution to the greening of the world

Time : 10:35-11:10

OMICS International Euro Biomass 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bo G Eriksson photo
Biography:

Bo G Eriksson retired from the University of Gothenburg. He has his Ph. D. in Sociology from the University of Gothenburg where he has held a position as lecturer and taught at several university departments. His main research has been as a member of the interdisciplinary team H-70 studying ageing longitudinally. By this paper he returns to an interest developed during his high school years. rn

Abstract:

The speech gives an simple review of the possibilities of using waste bio-mass for agroforestry in arid and semi-arid areas. In these areas there are to two key factors: water and soil carbon content. Atmosphere humidity is a valuable source of water which puts less stress on groundwater and surface water assets. As recently mentioned in Nature organic fibre could be used to enrich the soil carbon content. Such agricultural methods have successfully been practised in the Sahel area using locally produced agricultural waste and leaves from trees.rnLarge quantities of organic fibre waste are presently burned in in Europe. As an alternative to burning there are three benefits of using organic fibres to enhance soil carbon content in deserts. 1 Burning organic carbon releases CO2 to the atmosphere while placing it as a soil layer it preserves the carbon in the ground, 2 The new vegetation in earlier barren land collects CO2 from the air. 3 The vegetation and the layer of soil with a higher carbon content also collect and preserve more water from dew fall and mist. rnAs an example organic textile waste can be of special interest as the recycling processes are underdeveloped in Europe and. At least 5% of the fibres are so worn that they do not qualify for other recycling processes. There are of course lots of difficulties to solve. Agroforestry in these areas would also contribute to living conditions of populations, but also to conflicts with current activities in the areas.rn

Break: Networking and Refreshment Break 11:10-11:25 @ Albany Foyer
  • Sessions: Biomass Conversion Methods | Biomass Applications | Environmental Impact of Biomass | Biomass Market Analysis
Location: Hampton Suit
Speaker

Chair

Tatjana Stevanovic

Laval University, Canada

Session Introduction

Tatjana Stevanovic

Laval University, Canada

Title: High purity lignin from new Organosolv biorefinery

Time : 11:25-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Tatjana Stevanovic has completed her undergraduate and graduate studies up to PhD at the University of Belgrade at which she was teaching Wood Chemistry and Chemical Transformation of Wood until 1997. Since then she is teaching these same cources at Laval University and performing research on bioactive polyphenols as well as on polymeric applications of lignins. She has published numerous scientific papers and book chapters as well as Wood chemistry textbook. She has deposited a international patent on new organoslv process leading to highly pure lignin along with cellulose pulp and bioactive extractives from pre-extraction.

Abstract:

The transformation of lignocellulosic biomass has become a particular interest for fuel and chemical productions. Lignins are the major polyphenolic polymers available presently from commercial pulping processes (kraft, sulfite). These industrial lignins enclose sulfur in their structures and have relatively important contents of ashes and residual carbohydrates. We are presenting here a new organosolv process which consists of pretreatment of biomass followed by pulping with the same solvent mixture in presence of Lewis acid catalyst. The lignin recovered from this process preserves the native lignin features. This new strategy of organosolv biorefinery allows not only the access to valuable secondary metabolites from the pretreatment, but also to cellulosic pulp and most importantly to high purity lignin. The comparative studies on other organosolv lignins (produced in our laboratory according to the published procedures) like Alcell and Lignol demonstrate that, our lignin has low condensation index (as calculated from FT-IR spectra), preserves the -O-4 moieties (identified in 2D HSQC NMR) and have higher free-phenol content (determined from 31P NMR ). It has high Klason lignin content, low carbohydrate (HPLC analysis) and ash content (ASTM). The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis of our lignin revealed a high Tg (between 140 and 155°C) which is the property to be explored for high value applications in composites and carbon fiber production. The results obtained from melt electro-spinning assay with this high purity organosolv lignin indicate a great potential for its carbon fiber and other high value applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Álvaro Cruz-Izquierdo has completed his PhD on enzymatic biosynthesis of biodiesel and biopolymers in 2013 from Univeristy of Basque Country (Spain). He has worked on biobased technogly in the last 8 years, and also has teaching experience on Molecular Biology, Enzymology and Analytical Chemistry. He currently works as Research Associate at the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies at the Univeristy of Bath in the framework of CLEVER (Closed Loop Emotionally Valuable E-waste Recovery) project lead by Dr Janet L. Scott.

Abstract:

Cellulose, the most abundant polymer in nature, is composed of glucose units with the resulting linear polymeric chains having both inter- and intrachain hydrogen bonding in the crystalline polymer. In recent years, ionic liquids have been shown to be exceptional solvents for cellulose and thus hold great promise as biomass pre-treatment media. Additionally, the reconstitution of cellulose after ionic liquid not only facilitates formation of films, but also the pre-treatment increases enzymatic digestibility by cellulases. Different fillers can be also added to cellulose in order to give new properties to the regenerated films, such as greater flame retardancy or hydrophobicity. The aim of this work is to develop new cellulose-based films in order to use them as printing board for electronics. In this way, this new bio-based scaffold will hold conductive ink and different metals that are found in electronics. Moreover, an enzymatic treatement with cellulases will decompose the cellulose scaffolds and will facilitate the recovery of the precious metals in the material. In this work, α-cellulose was solubilised by 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and cellulose films were obtained by phase inversion and treated with different fillers (e.g. laponite, amonium polyphosphate) and hydrophobizing agents (e.g. ethyl 2-cyanoacrylate, lignin). Different enzymatic studies were carried out in order to understand how they are affected by added fillers, agents and most metals found in e-waste. Moreover, a particular effort was made in order to develop specific method to use lignin as hydrophobizing agent.

Speaker
Biography:

Yifei Zhang has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from Harbin Insititute of Technology in 2011 and postdoctoral studies at the age of 36 years from Harbin Insititute of Technology in 2015. In 2011, he started to work in Harbin Insititute of Technology. His major research direction is biomass energy space planning in recent years. He has published 11 papers in reputed journals and published 1 book in China Building Industry Press. In 4 years, he presided 5 research projects (including 1 national research projects) as a head and total research funding is ¥914,000; at the same time, he involved in 2 national research projects.

Abstract:

In order to alleviate the energy shortage problem in northeast China, we apply “Energy landscape” theories and methods to guide and control the development of biomass energy from the perspective of spatial planning, and try to make full use of the rich resource of agricultural biomass in Heilongjiang province. By analyzing biomass energy production potential, we have established development orientation of biomass energy in Heilongjiang, which is to develop agriculture and limit deforestation. Further, we make analyze energy supply and energy demand as the key affecting factors, and improve strategy of space planning with biomass energy’s space network model on the basis of cross research between energy planning and spatial planning. In the revising process, we try to reveal laws of quantitative relation between settlements’ positions and transportation cost with GIS analysis tools. On the basis of theory, we select Fujin county as the research target to explore the optimal layout forms of biomass power plant development network, and this is the core research content for founding biomass energy’s space network model. Because different towns’ layout density and positions’ relation can impact space network model’s forms, we revise the model’s structure and shapes to make it to be more economical. By drawing up development strategy and founding biomass energy’s spatial network model, we can optimize the biomass energy consumption structure and reduce non-renewable energy consumption indirectly, and this kind of crucial energy-saving strategy should be promoted in the coming decades to slow down the process of problem of energy crisis getting worse.

Speaker
Biography:

I have completed my PhD from the University Putra Malaysia and with a postdoctoral studies offered from the Institute of tropical Forest , University Putra malaysia . Iam the research coodinatore of the faculty of environmental studies, Kaduna state university Nigeria and projector coordinator of the department of enviironmental managemen of the same faculty. I have published more than 23 papers in reputed journals and I have won three international research grants.

Abstract:

The tropical forest ecosystem play a critical role in the forest carbon input and it is important to understand the rate of occurrences by quantifying the forest biomass and its effect on soil properties in relation to microclimate condition and environmental factors. The study was conducted in the tropical forest ecosystem of Malaysia. The aim of the study was to estimate the forest carbon input and its effects on changes soil properties in the tropical forests. The Malaysia lowland tropical forest was found to be a carbon sink with an accumulation rate of total above ground biomass (TAGB), below ground biomass (BGB) and total forest carbon (SOCs) of 2788.64 to 3009.97, 100.88 to 134.94 and 2996.13 to 3088.98 mg ha-1 respectively and varied between February and September and October and January. The soil properties; total organic carbon (TOC), soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil carbon stock (SOCstock) varied in relation to forest biomass at a ranges of 1.1 to 3.0, 1.1 to 5.89 and 58.01 to 70.46 mg ha-1 , respectively. The forest biomass gradually increase over time and also influence the concentration and increase in soil properties in present of environmental factors responsible for physiological activity. The multiple linear regression and Pearson correlation indicated a strong positive correlation (R2=0.98, p<0.01) between forest biomass, soil properties and environmental factors. The tropical lowland forest of Malaysia indicated to increase the forest biomass over time and significantly influenced the concentration of soil properties.

Break: Lunch Break 13:25-14:25 @ Albany Foyer

Saida Tayibi

Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Morocco

Title: Bio-fertilizers from biomasses and wastes: high added value products for agriculture

Time : 14:25-14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Saida has a master degree in functional materials (2015). Actually, she is a PhD student in Center for Advanced Materials (CAM), Mohammed VI Polytechnic University in collaboration with National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA).

Abstract:

The growing demand for energy, water and high value-added products have considerable economic and environmental issues and highlights the need to recycle and valorize the wastes. The Valorization of wastes is one of the routes that can contribute to a future sustainable economy; the challenge is to find the appropriate technologies that can convert wastes into bioenergy and by-products. In this process, organic waste and lignocellulosic biomass appear naturally as the main renewable materials able to providing not only alternative energy sources but also intermediate molecules derived from green chemistry and enabling access to a range of new products and formulations. The production of bio-fertilizers from wastes and lignocellulosic biomass appear as promising alternative to chemical fertilizers that can be contribute to increase of soil fertility and agriculture efficiency in sustainable farming . The aim of this study is to develop and produce different new bio-fertilizers using different technologies such as pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion, composting and microalgae cultivation. Different technologies and bio-fertilizers developed in this study were be compared in term of soil fertility, energy efficiency and environmental impact.

  • Sessions: Advanced Biofuels | Production of Biofuels
Location: Hampton Suit
Speaker

Chair

Markku Saloheimo

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Finland

Session Introduction

Markku Saloheimo

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Finland

Title: Development of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei as an enzyme production cell factory for biorefineries

Time : 14:45-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Markku Saloheimo has completed his PhD in 1991 from Helsinki University and postdoctoral studies in University of Hannover. He is a Research team leader at VTT Technical Research Centre. He has published about 90 peer-reviewed papers and is an inventor in 23 patent families.

Abstract:

In biotechnical production processes of biofuels and chemicals from plant biomass, lignocellulose is converted to C5 and C6 sugars by hydrolytic enzymes. They form a major cost factor for the whole process. For this reason a lot of research and development work has been recently invested into making more efficient lignocellulose degradation enzyme cocktails and creating more efficient enzyme production strains. The major production host for biorefinery enzymes is the fungus Trichoderma reesei that can produce enzyme titres of over 100 g/l. Our institute has over 30 years of experience in the molecular, systems and synthetic biology as well as in strain improvement and bioprocess optimisation in this production system. We have used a number of different approaches to develop more potent hydrolytic enzyme mixtures and production strains with improved efficiency. For example, we have discovered novel enzymes from other filamentous fungi that can boost up the efficiency of the lignocellulose degradation enzyme mixtures. We have identified and deleted genes encoding major proteases that hamper the production of enzymes in T. reesei, in particular ones from a foreign organism. Furthermore, we have used systems biology approaches to identify new transcription factors regulating enzyme production, and enhanced enzyme productivity by modifying the expression of these factors. The establishment of better enzyme production and hydrolysis technology by these means will be discussed in the presentation.

Huang Juanjuan

Lanzhou University of Technology, China

Title: Heating Biogas Digester with Solar Energy: Research Status and Prospects

Time : 15:15-15:45

Speaker
Biography:

Huang Juanjuan has got her Master Degree from Lanzhou University in 2012. She is a engineer in Key Laboratory of Complementary Energy System of Biomass and Solar Energy, Gansu Province, China.

Abstract:

Solar heated biogas production technology, not only helps to improve the rate of anaerobic fermentation and biogas production yield, but also solves the problems like low yield or no biogas production under the cold circumstance very effectively. This technology supplies the energy efficiently and steadily with solar and bio-energy, and it has become a research focus for renewable energy, both in China and other countries. The summary of the related research status and the exploration about the prospects of this research development can contribute to the improvement of the technology. For this purpose, we have worked on the solar warming systems for small biogas production systems and biogas projects, including operation principle, thermal performance, biogas productivity, advantages and disadvantages, system applicability and so on. The prospective development of various solar heated biogas production systems is also discussed. Focusing on the cost-effective aspect of solar and biomass energy complementary CCHP with biogas system, and the solar and biomass energy complementary CHP with biogas systems was found to be the promising in the direction of small-scale solar warming biogas production systems and biogas project with solar energy. The results serve to guide the biogas production systems with solar warming and its engineering demonstration application; they also have significant value for the beautiful village and ecological civilization construction of China.

Speaker
Biography:

Saloua is currently doing her PhD at the Center for Advanced Materials, Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, in collaboration with the National Institute of Agronomic Research. She works on biofertilizers based on biopolymers. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in physical and chemical sciences (2010). In 2015, she obtained her engineering degree in process, energy and environment (Head of the class with the highest honor).

Abstract:

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the production of food will need to increase by 70% in order to supply the population which expected to reach approximately 9.5 billion in 2050. To respond on this exponential growth of the global population food need, fertilizers are one of the most important elements to increase the agriculture efficiency for objective to insure the global food security. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) are the three major elements required for plant growth. In the other hand, plant benefits just from a small quantity of conventional fertilizers (30–60% N, 10–20% P and 30–50% K), and the rest is lost by volatilization in the atmosphere, leaching into the groundwater or fixation in the soil. This fertilizers class has a negatively impact on the environment and are not economically efficient. The aim of our project is to produce a new generation of biofertilizers, using an eco-friendly coating based on biomass and biopolymers derived from biomass (cellulose, pectin, alginate, and chitin). These different produced biofertilizers are compared in term of the soil fertility, the physical properties, the nutrient release rate, the biodegradability in the soil after the total release and the environmental impact.

Break: Networking and Refreshment Break 16:05-16:20 @ Albany Foyer

Joseph Wood

University of Birmingham, UK

Title: Catalytic Upgrading of HTL Bio-Oil Using Bio-Pd/C Catalyst

Time : 16:20-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Joe Wood completed a BEng degree in Chemical Engineering at Loughborough University and PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Cambridge (2001). He has three years of industrial experience with BP and Albright and Wilson. Since 2001 he has worked at the University of Birmingham, where he was awarded a Chair in 2012 and leads the Chemical Reaction Engineering Group in the School of Chemical Engineering. He has published 72 journal papers and four book chapters.

Abstract:

With depleting oil reserves and increased worldwide demand for transportation fuels and chemicals, the need for an alternative fuel source is becoming increasingly apparent. Bio-oil is produced through fast pyrolysis or hydrothermal liquefaction routes1, 2. But the produced bio-oil has a high oxygen content, leading to a low heating value and lower stability over time. Hence methods to upgrade bio-oil to make it more closely resemble crude oil are urgently sought. Catalytic hydrotreatment is as one of the most promising technologies for hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) biofuel upgrading. In the current study, HTL bio-oil produced from a chlorella microalgae slurry in a continuous flow reactor was hydrotreated with bio-Pd/C. Bio-Pd-C uses metallic NP-decorated whole bacterial cells as chemical catalysts. The activity of the Bio-Pd/C catalyst was evaluated against commercial Pd/C. The upgrading potential of the bio-Pd/C was investigated under three variables; time, temperature and oil to catalyst ratio in a stirred reactor. Both catalysts Pd/C and bio-Pd/C showed similar activity under similar upgrading condition. Oxygen and nitrogen content were reduced by 65% and 35%, respectively, at 325°C in 4 h reaction time and bio-oil to catalyst ratio of 20. Further analysis of upgraded oil by GC-MS, Sim-Dist, and elemental analysis attributed to improvement in the fuel properties of bio-oil. Catalyst analysis with ICP-MS, TGA and elemental analyzer attributed that the biomass from bio-Pd/C contributed to bio-oil yield. 1. Xiu, S, Shahbazi, A., Renew. Sustain. Energy Reviews 2012, 16, 4406. 2. Mortensen, P.M. et al., Appl. Catal. A: Gen 2011, 407, 1.

Speaker
Biography:

Laura Vieira de Sousa Maia is an undergraduate student in Energy Engineering, at the University of Brasilia. Is a fellow of the Institutional Extension Program Scholarships since 2014 in Macaria project: Macaúba and Engineering : Oil production of pulp and almond of Macaúba and Gasification of its Waste . Has an article published in the Annals of the VI Meeting of Science and Technology Faculty Gama called Gasification of Macaúba: the Technical and Chemical Aspects Assessment.

Abstract:

The species Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq.) Lodd. Ex Mart. Macaúba common name, is an oleaginous fruit which has 4.000kg oil yield per hectare, ten times greater than soy. It is distributed throughout Brazil, its highest concentration in the Southeast, North and Midwest of the country. Their exploitation, as subsistence crop has become an alternative for the production of biodiesel, bio-kerosene for aviation and by-products of forest products.

The culture of macaúba is in domestication phase, and is still practiced an extractived in a small-scale culture. In this condition, many fruits of macaúba are lost by deterioration of endogenous enzymatic and/or microbial activity, damaging the quality of the oil. Thus, gasification is presented as an alternative use of these residues to generate electricity primarily for its internal use in agro-extractive communities.

This study is divided into four parts: pyrolysis, characterization of the fruit, chromatography of gases and generation of electricity. The steps of pyrolysis and characterization of the fruit have been completed, and it was possible to obtain high values of yield of pyrolysis and Potential Higher Calorific, 30, 54% and 23.1244 MJ / kg, respectively. The values obtained for the fixed carbon content, volatile content and ash content were respectively 74,615%, 23.18% and 5.44%.

Speaker
Biography:

Darshit Upadhyay is working as an Assistance Professor in Mechanical Engineering Department, Nirma University. He is pursuing PhD from the same institution. He has published one paper in International Reputed Journal( Energy).           
 

Abstract:

Large availability of agricultural land in India provides the country with abundant biomass energy resource of 500 million metric tonnes per year. With programmes like Make in India, Digital India putting the country on a fast track growth coupled with existing power deficit, it might be very difficult to meet the energy needs. India’s Energy Development Programme has been put to severe pressure with the ever increasing demand supply gap. Many interior regions of India also known as dark zones are yet to be connected with power grid. Biomass also happens to be the third largest primary source of energy after coal and oil. The current power production through biomass is 2,667 MW compared to the potential of about 18,000 MW . Uneven geographic distribution of biomass, improper supply chain distribution, availability of easier direct combustion methods restrict use of other efficient advanced technologies. Converting biomass into producer gas by gasification is one of the suitable ways for off grid power solution. This paper analyzes various challenges restrict the growth of biomass gasification in India. Thermal and Electrical routes for power generation from biomass are reviewed from technical and economical point of view.  Production of biomass and utilization are critically reviewed from yesteryears till the latest developments. Government policies and financial support is also brought under the purview of analysis. The analysis suggests a combined approach to promote awareness as well as subsidize or provide grants to overcome these challenges. Also, decentralized collection of biomass can lead extensive growth of small scale off grid biomass gasifier. In last few years, lots of research institutes and industries in India like IISC, TERI, ANKUR etc. have contributed a lot in all over growth of gasification technology in the country.